Archive For The “Resources” Category

Back to School for Nonprofit Professionals

Stack of resourceful books

A great way to get the training you need, as you complete work projects.

 
There are so many resources to help nonprofit professionals learn a new skill.
 
The Center for Sustainable Development is one such organization. What’s unique about their approach is they teach learners using their own work projects. For example, if you need to learn how to build an AdWords campaign for your organization, the online course at CSDi will teach and guide you step-by-step to build your organization’s AdWord campaign. So in the end, you will have a certificate for the online course and have completed your project.
 

CSDi offers many great online courses. Visit their website for the full list, <http://nonprofit.csd-i.org/>.

Optimizing Search Engines with Information Management Principles

Newspaper plane

 

Is SEO just information management? Well, maybe not quite, but it sure helps!

 
For the past few months I have been working on a lengthy search engine optimization (SEO) project and as an information guru, it has been truly fascinating!
 
The job of a search engine is to respond to a user’s query with a list of best and most appropriate websites. Search engines evaluate websites based on certain criteria such as content, URLs, headings, site speed, responsiveness, and history. For a website to be viewed favourably by a search engine, its data needs to be kept clean, tidy, and well organized. Each page, post, or image must be categorized and labelled properly. Anything stale, outdated, or unused must be removed. An SEO checklist for website is enormous, but it reflects the best practices for managing information.
 
Here are a few tips to both manage your websites information and optimize search engines:

  • Each web-page should be relevant, useful, and fresh, and have appropriate titles and tags.
  • Irrelevant, out of date, or incorrect information should be deleted.
  • All links must work. All external links should be checked periodically to ensure they are still appropriate.
  • All images should provide informative metadata.
  • Use categories and tags correctly.
  • Know your organization’s keywords and ensure your website supports them.

 
SEO, like information management, is an ongoing process, they both require regular maintenance, and nothing should be categorized as ‘miscellaneous’.
 
If you are interested in learning more about SEO or managing information, contact me and I will send you some great resources!

Be a Curator of Information

Newspaper plane

How do you stay informed?

 
If you are responsible for being an expert about a specific topic it is very important to stay informed on that topic. How do you do that? You can curate information using Google Alerts. By using this feature you will receive a message when content you have tagged as important is published online.
 
Catch all important updates using Google Alerts. Use your existing Google account or sign up for a new one, (you can learn about their policies here). Go to www.google.ca/alerts <https://www.google.ca/alerts>.
 
Create an alert using any relevant words including names of people. You can use Boolean operators as well. For example, if you want to receive an alert for the word “information”, “inform”, “informed”, or “informing” you can enter “inform*” the asterisk captures all words that start with those letters.
 
Settings wheel:

Set delivery time: This is a handy way to manage the emails. Rather than getting a message whenever content is published, you can have one message sent with a list of each piece of content. You can also set the time you want to receive the content.

Digest: Receive all alerts in a single email. (This will abbreviate the list, you may miss content)

Flag as irrelevant: If you need to search a word like “senior” you will receive alerts for a number of different uses for that word, for example both elderly people and people in their last year of US high school. Use the flag as irrelevant option to customize your alert.

How do you evaluate?

Newspaper plane

I had an interesting conversation with someone recently. They ask if they could tell me honestly what they thought about a project I’d poured myself into for the better part of a year. I said yes because I (want to believe) am open to criticism. The feedback was not too kind, but very thoughtful. I very much appreciated all they had to say. I wrote down all of their critiques and feel I honestly considered each point.

 

Evaluation is so important to success. It has to be critical and analyze the merits and faults of the work or project. How do you analyze, edit, or critique your work?

 

Here are some great resources to guide critical evaluation:

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